A pilot study of a text message and online brief contact intervention following self-harm or a suicide attempt: A mixed methods evaluation

Natasha Josifovski, Fiona Shand, Kirsten Morley, Justin Chia, Richard Henshaw, Katherine Petrie, Bilal Reda, Emily Li, Adam Theobald, Sandersan Onie, Michelle Torok, Sofian Berrouiguet, Philip J. Batterham, Gregory Carter, Paul Haber, Helen Christensen, Mark E. Larsen*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Hospital-treated self-harm is the single strongest risk factor for suicide [1]. Failure to provide rapid and effective follow-up care is associated with increased risk for repeat self-harm and suicide [2]. Brief contact interventions have been proposed as part of follow-up care, wherein a service uses media such as postcards or telephone calls to engage with individuals. These interventions overcome many of the challenges of traditional interventions by being relatively low cost, undemanding on the recipient, and scalable. Additionally, they appear to be associated with a reduction in the number of repeat self-harm episodes [3]. Brief contact interventions by SMS text message can help participants reconnect to healthcare services [4].
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-2
    Number of pages2
    JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
    Volume76
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2022

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