An early intervention programme had no detectable influence on the health status of people with musculoskeletal injuries following road traffic crashes: Comparative study

Susannah M. Littleton, D. C. Hughes, S. J. Poustie, B. J. Robinson, T. Neeman, P. N. Smith, I. D. Cameron

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    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To compare the health status of people with minor injuries from road traffic crashes that are exposed to an early, active intervention programme (intervention group) with those receiving usual care (control group) over a 12 month period. Design: Prospective comparative study using sequential cohorts. Subjects: People presenting to hospital emergency departments with mild to moderate musculoskeletal injuries following road traffic crashes. Main outcome measures: Physical Component Score (PCS) and Mental Component Score (MCS) of the Short Form 36 (SF-36) health status measure; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Functional Rating Index (FRI) recorded immediately post-crash, at 6 months and at 12 months after injury. Results: There were 95 participants allocated to the control group and 98 allocated to the intervention group. Participants were enrolled at a mean of 9.3 days following the crash. There were no significant differences in baseline health measures between the groups. Apart from a small improvement in anxiety for the intervention group, there were no significant differences in health status between the groups. Twenty percent of participants in the intervention group received treatment from external healthcare providers that was inconsistent with the recommendations of the intervention programme. Conclusions: The intervention programme failed to result in a clinically significant improvement in health outcomes compared with usual care. There is some evidence to suggest that the intervention had some psychological benefits, as evidenced by the small improvement in anxiety levels. Limited adherence, frequent use of co-interventions, or other factors (such as intervention content or intensity) may have reduced its effect.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)304-311
    Number of pages8
    JournalInjury
    Volume45
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

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