An outbreak of salmonellosis associated with duck prosciutto at a Northern Territory restaurant

Anthony Dk Draper, Claire N. Morton, Joshua Ni Heath, Justin A. Lim, Anninka I. Schiek, Stephanie Davis, Vicki L. Krause, Peter G. Markey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In June 2015, an outbreak of salmonellosis occurred among people who had eaten at a restaurant in Darwin, Northern Territory over 2 consecutive nights. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of diners who ate at the restaurant on 19 and 20 June 2015. Diners were telephoned and a questionnaire recorded symptoms and menu items consumed. An outbreak case was defined as anyone with laboratory confirmed Salmonella Typhimurium PT9 (STm9) or a clinically compatible illness after eating at the restaurant. Environmental health officers inspected the premises and collected food samples. We contacted 79/83 of the cohort (response rate 95%); 21 were cases (attack rate 27%), and 9 had laboratory confirmed STm9 infection. The most commonly reported symptoms were diarrhoea (100%), abdominal pain (95%), fever (95%) and nausea (95%). Fifteen people sought medical attention and 7 presented to hospital. The outbreak was most likely caused by consumption of duck prosciutto, which was consumed by all cases (OR 18.6, CI 3.0-∞, P < 0.01) and was prepared on site. Salmonella was not detected in any food samples but a standard plate count of 2 x 107 colony forming units per gram on samples of duck prosciutto demonstrated bacterial contamination. The restaurant used inappropriate methodology for curing the duck prosciutto. Restaurants should consider purchasing pre-made cured meats, or if preparing them on site, ensure that they adhere to safe methods of production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E16-E20
JournalCommunicable diseases intelligence quarterly report
Volume41
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2017
Externally publishedYes

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