Carbon allocation to major metabolites in illuminated leaves is not just proportional to photosynthesis when gaseous conditions (CO2 and O2) vary

Cyril Abadie, Camille Bathellier, Guillaume Tcherkez*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In gas-exchange experiments, manipulating CO2 and O2 is commonly used to change the balance between carboxylation and oxygenation. Downstream metabolism (utilization of photosynthetic and photorespiratory products) may also be affected by gaseous conditions but this is not well documented. Here, we took advantage of sunflower as a model species, which accumulates chlorogenate in addition to sugars and amino acids (glutamate, alanine, glycine and serine). We performed isotopic labelling with 13CO2 under different CO2/O2 conditions, and determined 13C contents to compute 13C-allocation patterns and build-up rates. The 13C content in major metabolites was not found to be a constant proportion of net fixed carbon but, rather, changed dramatically with CO2 and O2. Alanine typically accumulated at low O2 (hypoxic response) while photorespiratory intermediates accumulated under ambient conditions and at high photorespiration, glycerate accumulation exceeding serine and glycine build-up. Chlorogenate synthesis was relatively more important under normal conditions and at high CO2 and its synthesis was driven by phosphoenolpyruvate de novo synthesis. These findings demonstrate that carbon allocation to metabolites other than photosynthetic end products is affected by gaseous conditions and therefore the photosynthetic yield of net nitrogen assimilation varies, being minimal at high CO2 and maximal at high O2.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)94-106
    Number of pages13
    JournalNew Phytologist
    Volume218
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

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