Child Wellbeing and Protection as a Regulatory System in the Neoliberal Age: Forms of Aboriginal Agency and Resistance Engaged to Confront the Challenges for Aboriginal People and Community-Based Aboriginal Organisations

Deirdre Howard-Wagner

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Nearly 20 years ago, 'Bringing Them Home' acknowledged that, while varying in their aspirations, capacities and awareness of options, community-based Aboriginal organisations are best placed to provide for the wellbeing of Aboriginal families, children and young people. Today, the 'promising practices' of many community-based Aboriginal organisations continue to evidence their important, nonpareil role, which extends beyond functional service delivery - including intercultural mediation between Aboriginal peoples and the state, reconciling the two domains - while achieving the aspirations of Aboriginal people and communities who aspire for a 'deep transformation' of the child wellbeing and protection system. Nonetheless, recognition of the capacity of communitybased Aboriginal organisations still remains under-realised and services relating to the wellbeing and protection of the Aboriginal child and young person remain fragmented
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)88-102pp
    JournalAustralian Indigenous Law Review
    Volume19
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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