Effect of simulated shipping conditions on sensory attributes and volatile composition of commercial white and red wines

Anthony L. Robinson, Martha Mueller, Hildegarde Heymann*, Susan E. Ebeler, Paul K. Boss, Peter S. Solomon, Robert D. Trengove

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    49 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A major concern when shipping wine is whether the condition in which it is received at its destination is the same as when it left the winery. This study explored the effects of shipping conditions on six varietal wines. Four white wines and four red wines were exposed to four different storage conditions to create 32 treatments. Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Sauvignon blanc, and Chardonnay wines were from one producer and of the same vintage. One Merlot and three Cabernet Sauvignon wines were from different labels by the same producer. Storage conditions included 20°C, 40°C, 20/40°C (reflecting diurnal cycle in temperatures), and a sample that traveled in the trunk of a car for three weeks. The 32 wines were evaluated using sensory descriptive analysis. Trained panelists, 11 for white wine and 13 for red wine, rated the wines on 14 and 23 attributes, respectively. Volatiles were analyzed using a HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis. Both sensory and analytical results showed significant differences among the wines stored at the higher temperatures. Differences were noted for a number of compounds, including higher concentrations of vitispirane 1 and 2, TDN, and p-cymene and reductions in several esters and acetates, which are characteristic of aged wines. This is the first study that has assessed sensory changes in wines under conditions that would potentially be experienced by wine in transit.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)337-347
    Number of pages11
    JournalAmerican Journal of Enology and Viticulture
    Volume61
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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