Effectiveness of H1N1/09 monovalent and trivalent influenza vaccines against hospitalization with laboratory-confirmed H1N1/09 influenza in Australia: A test-negative case control study

Allen C. Cheng*, Tom Kotsimbos, Heath A. Kelly, Louis B. Irving, Simon D. Bowler, Simon G.A. Brown, Mark Holmes, Christine R. Jenkins, Philip Thompson, Graham Simpson, Richard Wood-Baker, Sanjaya N. Senanayake, Stephen J. Brady, David L. Paterson, Peter A. Wark, John W. Upham, Tony M. Korman, Dominic E. Dwyer, Grant W. Waterer, Paul M. Kelly

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We aimed to estimate the effectiveness of H1N1/09 containing influenza vaccines against hospitalization from influenza in Australia. We performed a test-negative case control study in patients hospitalized in 15 sentinel Australian hospitals between March and November 2010, comparing influenza vaccination (H1N1/09 monovalent or 2010 seasonal trivalent) in hospitalized patients with PCR-confirmed influenza compared to PCR-negative controls. Between March and November 2010, 1169 hospitalized patients were tested for suspected influenza, of which influenza vaccine status was ascertained in 165/238 patients with H1N1/09 influenza, 40/64 with seasonal influenza and 558/867 test negative controls; 24% of H1N1/09 cases, 43% of seasonal influenza cases and 54% of controls were vaccinated. VE against hospitalisation with H1N1/09 influenza after adjusting for age, medical comorbidities and pregnancy status was estimated at 49% (95% CI: 13%, 70%). Influenza vaccination was associated with a reduction in hospitalisation caused by H1N1/09 influenza in the 2010 southern hemisphere winter season.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7320-7325
Number of pages6
JournalVaccine
Volume29
Issue number43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effectiveness of H1N1/09 monovalent and trivalent influenza vaccines against hospitalization with laboratory-confirmed H1N1/09 influenza in Australia: A test-negative case control study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this