Evolution of the eye. Scientists now have a clear vision of how our notoriously complex eye came to be.

Trevor D. Lamb*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    16 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The eyes of vertebrate animals are so complex that creationists have long argued that they could not have formed by natural selection. Soft tissues rarely fossilize. But by comparing eye structures and embryological development of the eye in vertebrate species, scientists have gained crucial insights into the organ's origin. These findings suggest that our camera-style eye has surprisingly ancient roots and that prior to acquiring the elements necessary to operate as a visual organ it functioned to detect light for modulating our long-ago ancestors' circadian rhythms.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)64-69
    Number of pages6
    JournalScientific American
    Volume305
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

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