Exploring high temperature responses of photosynthesis and respiration to improve heat tolerance in wheat

Bradley C. Posch, Buddhima C. Kariyawasam, Helen Bramley, Onoriode Coast, Richard A. Richards, Matthew P. Reynolds, Richard Trethowan, Owen K. Atkin*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    71 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    High temperatures account for major wheat yield losses annually and, as the climate continues to warm, these losses will probably increase. Both photosynthesis and respiration are the main determinants of carbon balance and growth in wheat, and both are sensitive to high temperature. Wheat is able to acclimate photosynthesis and respiration to high temperature, and thus reduce the negative affects on growth. The capacity to adjust these processes to better suit warmer conditions stands as a potential avenue toward reducing heat-induced yield losses in the future. However, much remains to be learnt about such phenomena. Here, we review what is known of high temperature tolerance in wheat, focusing predominantly on the high temperature responses of photosynthesis and respiration. We also identify the many unknowns that surround this area, particularly with respect to the high temperature response of wheat respiration and the consequences of this for growth and yield. It is concluded that further investigation into the response of photosynthesis and respiration to high temperature could present several methods of improving wheat high temperature tolerance. Extending our knowledge in this area could also lead to more immediate benefits, such as the enhancement of current crop models.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)5051-5069
    Number of pages19
    JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
    Volume70
    Issue number19
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2019

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