Exploring the link between mine action and transitional justice in Cambodia

Dahlia Simangan*, Rebecca Gidley

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper examines mine action in Cambodia and its implications for common conceptions of civil society and transitional justice. The complexities of past Cambodian conflicts and the strained state-civil society relationship at present have led to a complicated legacy of landmines. The collective harm Cambodian people have experienced also blurs the line between victimhood and perpetration of crime, further complicating transitional justice in the Cambodian context. Exploring the link between mine action and transitional justice in Cambodia reveals that civil society organisations involved in mine action are not separate from the state contrary to the common conceptualisation of civil society as autonomous. It also demonstrates that mine action is responding to more complex elements of Cambodian conflicts than the retributive model of transitional justice. The participatory approaches to mine action highlight local agency and active involvement, which are crucial in creating a civil society that encourages an empowered citizenry.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)221-243
    Number of pages23
    JournalGlobal Change, Peace and Security
    Volume31
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2019

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