Frontal slow wave resting EEG power is higher in individuals at Ultra High Risk for psychosis than in healthy controls but is not associated with negative symptoms or functioning

Miranda Sollychin, Bradley N. Jack, Andrea Polari, Ayaka Ando, G. Paul Amminger, Connie Markulev, Patrick D. McGorry, Barnaby Nelson, Thomas J. Whitford, Hok Pan Yuen, Suzie Lavoie*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decreased brain activity in the frontal region, as indicated by increased slow wave EEG power measured by electrodes place on the skull over this area, in association with negative symptoms has previously been shown to distinguish ultra-high risk (UHR)individuals who later transitioned to psychosis (UHR-P)from those who did not transition (UHR-NP). The aims of the current study were to: 1)replicate these results and 2)investigate whether similar association between increased frontal slow wave activity and functioning shows any value in the prediction of transition to psychosis in UHR individuals. The brain activity, recorded using EEG, of 44 UHR individuals and 38 healthy controls was included in the analyses. Symptom severity was assessed in UHR participants and functioning was measured in both groups. The power in the theta frequency band in the frontal region of UHR individuals was higher than in controls. However, there was no difference between the UHR-P and the UHR-NP groups, and no change in slow frequency power following transition to psychosis. The correlation between delta frequency power and negative symptoms previously observed was not present in our UHR cohort, and there was no association between frontal delta or theta and functioning in either group. Increased delta power was rather correlated with depressive symptoms in the UHR group. Future research will be needed to better understand when, in the course of the illness, does the slow wave activity in the frontal area becomes impaired.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-299
Number of pages7
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume208
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

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