Guidelines and training initiatives that support communication in cross-cultural primary-care settings: Appraising their implementability using normalization process theory

Tomas de Brun, Mary O'Reilly-de Brun, Evelyn van Weel-Baumgarten, Chris Van Weel, Christopher Dowrick, Christos Lionis, Catherine O'Donnell, Nicola Burns, Frances Mair, Aristoula Saridaki, Maria Papadakaki, Christine Princz, Maria van den Muijsenbergh, Anne Macfarlane

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background. Guidelines and training initiatives (G/TIs) available to support communication in cross-cultural primary health care consultations are not routinely used. We need to understand more about levers and barriers to their implementation and identify G/TIs likely to be successfully implemented in practice. Objective. To report a mapping process used to identify G/TIs and to prospectively appraise their implementability, using Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Methods. RESTORE is a 4-year EU FP-7 project. We used purposeful and network sampling to identify experts in statutory and non-statutory agencies across Austria, England, Greece, Ireland, Scotland and the Netherlands who recommended G/TI data from the grey literature. In addition, a peer review of literature was conducted in each country. Resulting data were collated using a standardized Protocol Mapping Document. G/TIs were identified for inclusion by (i) initial elimination of incomplete G/TI material; (ii) application of filtering criteria; and (iii) application of NPT. Results. 20 G/TIs met selection criteria: 8 guidelines and 12 training initiatives. Most G/TIs were identified in the Netherlands (n = 7), followed by Ireland (n = 6) and England (n = 5). Fewer were identified in Scotland (n = 2), and none in Greece or Austria. The majority (n = 13) were generated without the inclusion of migrant service users. All 20 were prospectively appraised for potential implementability by applying NPT. Conclusions. NPT is useful as a means of prospectively testing G/TIs for implementability. Results indicate a need to initiate meaningful engagement of migrants in the development of G/TIs. A European-based professional standard for development and assessment of cross-cultural communication resources is advised.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)420-425
    JournalFamily Practice
    Volume32
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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