Health shocks and child time allocation decisions by households: evidence from Ethiopia

Yonatan Dinku, David Fielding, Murat Genc

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Little is currently known about the effects of shocks to parental health on the allocation of childrens time between alternative activities. Using longitudinal data from the Ethiopian Young Lives surveys of 2006 and 2009, we analyse the effect of health shocks on the amount of childrens time spent in work, leisure and education. One key contribution of the paper is that we distinguish between child labour as defined by organisations such as the International Labour Organisation and other types of child work, such as light domestic chores. We find that paternal illness increases the time spent in income-generating work but maternal illness increases the time spent in domestic work. Moreover, maternal illness has a relatively large effect on daughters while paternal illness has a relatively large effect on sons. Overall, parental illness leads to large and significant increases in the amount of child labour.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)23
    JournalIZA : Journal of Labor Economics
    Volume7
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

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