International medical graduates and general practice training: How do educational leaders facilitate the transition from new migrant to local family doctor?

Susan M. Wearne*, James B. Brown, Catherine Kirby, David Snadden

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives: To document medical educators’ experience and initiatives in training international medical graduates (IMGs) to become general practitioners (GP). Design: Qualitative social-constructivist emergent design with descriptive and interpretive analyses. Setting: GP vocational training in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the Netherlands, and UK. Participants: Twenty-eight leaders of GP training. Intervention: Data collected from public documents, published literature and 27 semi-structured interviews. Main outcome measures: Tensions in training and innovations in response to these tensions. Results: Medical educators identified tension in teaching IMGs as it could be different to teaching domestic graduates in any or all aspects of a training program. They felt an ethical responsibility to support IMGs to provide quality health care in their adopted country but faced multiple challenges to achieve this. They described initiatives to address these throughout GP training. Conclusions: IMG’s differing educational needs will benefit from flexible individualized adaptation of training programs.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1065-1072
    Number of pages8
    JournalMedical Teacher
    Volume41
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Sept 2019

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