Nitric oxide induces polarization of actin in encephalitogenic T cells and inhibits their in vitro trans-endothelial migration in a p70S6 kinase-independent manner.

Maria A. Staykova*, Leise A. Berven, William B. Cowden, David O. Willenborg, Michael F. Crouch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits both actively induced and transferred autoimmune encephalomyelitis. To explore potential mechanisms, we examined the ability of NO to inhibit migration of T lymphoblasts through both collagen matrices and monolayers of rat brain endothelial cells. The NO donor 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3, 3-bis (2-aminoethyl)-1-triazene (HOBAT) inhibited migration in a concentration-dependent manner. NO pretreatment of T cells inhibited migration through untreated endothelial cells, but NO pretreatment of endothelial cells had no inhibitory effect on untreated T cells. Therefore NO's migration inhibitory action was mediated through its effect on T cells and not endothelial cells. HOBAT did not inhibit migration by inducing T-cell death but rather by polarizing the T cells, resulting in a morphology suggestive of migrating cells. P70S6 kinase, shown to have a role in NO-induced migration inhibition in fibroblasts, had no role in the inhibitory effect of NO on T-cell migration. Thus, HOBAT did not alter p70S6K activity nor did rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of p70S6K, inhibit HOBAT-induced T-cell morphological changes or T-cell migration. We suggest that NO-induced morphological changes result in T cells with predefined migratory directionality, thus limiting the ability of these cells to respond to other migratory signals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1337-1339
Number of pages3
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume17
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2003
Externally publishedYes

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