Retrieval-induced forgetting in educational contexts: Monitoring, expertise, text integration, and test format

Marie Carroll*, Jonathan Campbell-Ratcliffe, Hannah Murnane, Timothy Perfect

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    71 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Retrieval practice leads to the impaired recall of related but unpractised items, an effect termed retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF). Two experiments showed that RIF occurred with "real world" educational material, and isolated several boundary conditions for the phenomenon. Experiment 1 showed that integration of material available to experts but not to novices in a domain of knowledge, protected against RIF, which disappeared after a 24 hours. Experiment 2 examined the impact on RIF of the degree of coherence or integration of the text material itself and the type of test format administered. Text coherence did not influence RIF, which occurred for the short answer and essay tests, but not for the multiple choice test. In both experiments, those participants who demonstrated RIF were able to monitor accurately the likelihood of recall impairment, suggesting that RIF may not be an unconscious process. Results are discussed in relation to exam preparation strategies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)580-606
    Number of pages27
    JournalEuropean Journal of Cognitive Psychology
    Volume19
    Issue number4-5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

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