Social identity, status characteristics and social networks: Predictors of advice seeking in a manufacturing facility

Martin P. Copeland*, Katherine J. Reynolds, Jamie B. Burton

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In the sociological tradition, status characteristics and patterns of interpersonal relations within a social network are considered important in explaining organizational behaviour (e.g. influence, cooperation). In the social identity tradition, perceptions of shared psychological group membership and group prototypicality are considered important in explaining many of the same organizational behaviours. The present paper explores core variables within each of these perspectives as predictors of advice seeking among supervisors in a manufacturing facility. Dyadic measures of group assignment are found to better predict advice seeking than measures taken at the individual level. Identification with work groups predicted advice seeking from those perceived to be in the same group, and also from structural equivalents. Implications for theory and further research are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)75-87
    Number of pages13
    JournalAsian Journal of Social Psychology
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

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