Special issue introduction–working towards allyship: acknowledging and redressing power imbalances in psychology

Brett Scholz*, Sarah E. Gordon, Gareth J. Treharne

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this special issue, we create space to discuss and extend on conceptualisation, theorisation, and practice of allyship in qualitative psychology research. Allyship can be defined broadly as a way of redressing power imbalances between privileged and marginalised groups and individuals and is thus strongly aligned with qualitative methods founded on social justice. The discipline of psychology, in contrast, has traditionally contributed to oppression of people considered not White, not heterosexual, not male, disabled, poor, not sane, and/or Indigenous. The contributions in this special issue consider the role of psychology in redressing this oppression. In this introduction to the special issue, we explore some of the common threads across these contributions, namely the ways in which power and control, relationships, and intersectionality and diversity relate to research involving allyship. Overall, the work presented in this special issue furthers knowledge and innovation in allyship and the particular place of allyship in qualitative research within psychology and beyond.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)451-458
    Number of pages8
    JournalQualitative Research in Psychology
    Volume18
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2021

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