Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, Australia

Peter Collignon*, Graeme R. Nimmo, Thomas Gottlieb, Iain B. Gosbell

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    81 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is common and increasing worldwide. A retrospective review wyas undertaken to quantify the number of cases, their place of acquisition, and the proportions caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in 17 hospitals in Australia. Of 3,192 episodes, 1,571 (49%) were community onset. MRSA caused 40% of hospital-onset episodes and 12% of community-onset episodes. The median rate of SAB was 1.48/1,000 admissions (range 0.61-3.24; median rate for hospital-onset SAB was 0.7/1,000 and for community onset 0.8/1,000 admissions). Using these rates, we estimate that ≈6,900 episodes of SAB occur annually in Australia (35/100,000 population). SAB is common, and a substantial proportion of cases may be preventable. The epidemiology is evolving, with >10% of community-onset SAB now caused by MRSA. This is an emerging infectious disease concern and is likely to impact on empiric antimicrobial drug prescribing in suspected cases of SAB.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)554-561
    Number of pages8
    JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
    Volume11
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

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