Suffering, existential distress and temporality in the provision of terminal sedation

Nathan Emmerich*, Michael Chapman

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION While there is a great deal to agree with in the essay Expanded Terminal Sedation in End-of-Life Care there is, we think, a need to more fully appreciate the human istic side of both palliative and end-of life care.1 Not only does the underlying philosophy of palliative care arguably differ from that which guides curative medicine,2 dying patients are in a uniquely vulnerable position given our cultural disinclination towards open discussions of death and dying. In this brief response, we critically engage Gilbertson et al’s essay and seek to contextualise the perspective they put forward.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)263-264
    Number of pages2
    JournalJournal of Medical Ethics
    Volume49
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2023

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Suffering, existential distress and temporality in the provision of terminal sedation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this