Thailand's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from production-based and consumption-based perspectives

Panittra Ninpanit*, Arunima Malik, Takako Wakiyama, Arne Geschke, Manfred Lenzen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past few decades, Thailand has been one of the highly open economies and one of the most successful countries in applying the export-led growth model. At the same time, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions released in Thailand tripled between 1990 and 2015. To examine how international trade plays a role in shaping Thailand's CO2 emissions inventory, we compare emissions under both production-based and consumption-based accounting over 1990–2015 and disaggregate total CO2 emissions into traded and non-traded parts. We also use a multi-regional input-output database for performing a structural decomposition analysis (SDA) to investigate the factors contributing to changes in CO2 emissions. We find that Thailand continually stood out as a net carbon exporting country. CO2 embodied in exports accounted, on average, for 40% of domestically produced emissions. Our SDA results suggest that traded and non-traded emissions grew mainly due to increasing per-capita consumption in Thailand and abroad. The retarding effect from energy efficiency improvement was significant but not sufficient to reduce emissions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110877
JournalEnergy Policy
Volume133
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Thailand's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from production-based and consumption-based perspectives'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this