The political solidarity model of social change: Dynamics of self-categorization in intergroup power relations

Emina Subašić*, Katherine J. Reynolds, John C. Turner

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    259 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Social and political change involves a challenge to the status quo in intergroup power relations. Traditionally, the social psychology of social change has focused on disadvantaged minority groups collectively challenging the decisions, actions, and policies of those in positions of established authority. In contrast, this article presents a political solidarity model of social change that explores the process by which members of the majority challenge the authority in solidarity with the minority. It is argued that political solidarity as a social change process involves a contest between the authority and the minority over the meaning of a shared (higher order) identity with the majority. When identity ceases to be shared with the authority and becomes shared with the minority, majority challenge to authority in solidarity with the minority becomes possible. The model's contributions to existing social psychological approaches to social change are also discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)330-352
    Number of pages23
    JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Review
    Volume12
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

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