The Relationship between Cortical Inhibition and Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

Daphne Voineskos, Andrea J. Levinson, Yinming Sun, Mera S. Barr, Faranak Farzan, Tarek K. Rajji, Paul B. Fitzgerald, Daniel M. Blumberger, Zafiris J. Daskalakis*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dysfunctional cortical inhibition (CI) is postulated as a key neurophysiological mechanism in major depressive disorder. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the treatment of choice for resistant depression and ECT has been associated with enhanced CI. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CI and ECT response in resistant depression. Twenty-five patients with treatment resistant depression underwent an acute course of ECT. CI was indexed by the cortical silent period (CSP) and short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI), through TMS-EMG. CI and clinical response was measured prior to beginning an acute ECT course and within 48 hours of the last ECT treatment in the course. Clinical response to ECT was assessed by HDRS-17 before and after an acute course of ECT. We found that there was a significant difference in CSP at baseline between responder and non-responder groups (p = 0.044). Baseline CSP predicted therapeutic response to ECT with sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 60%. There were no changes in CSP or SICI after administration of the ECT course. Our findings suggest that duration of pre-treatment CSP may be a useful predictor of therapeutic response to ECT in patients with TRD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number37461
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

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