When employees behave badly: The roles of contract importance and workplace familism in predicting negative reactions to psychological contract breach

Simon Lloyd D. Restubog*, Thomas J. Zagenczyk, Prashant Bordia, Robert L. Tang

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this paper, we examine the influence of contract importance, feelings of violation, and workplace familism on the relationship between psychological contract breach and organizational deviance. Results from a study of 168 supervisor-employee dyads in a pharmaceutical organization suggest that (a) feelings of violation mediated the relationship between perceived breach and supervisor-rated organizational deviance; (b) relational and transactional contract importance influenced the relationship between breach and feelings of violation such that the relationship was stronger under conditions of high relational and transactional importance; and (c) high levels of workplace familism mitigated the effects of feelings of violation on supervisor-rated organizational deviance.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)673-686
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
    Volume43
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'When employees behave badly: The roles of contract importance and workplace familism in predicting negative reactions to psychological contract breach'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this